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Publicity

Jack Jones Literary Arts creates customized literary campaigns including: strategy development, social media consultations, online media outreach, press kit development, speaking and launch engagements, and social media planning. Jack Jones provides both primary and supplemental publicity services.

To learn more about publicity services and pricing, write to Kima with a book project summary and e-galley, if available, at kima@jackjonesliteraryarts.com. We are currently reading for 2019 and 2020 and are especially looking for commercial fiction, literary fiction and YA novels. We also have a special interest in cook books.

At this time, Jack Jones Literary Arts does not publicize self-published authors or children's picture book authors, including middle grade books. We do not publicize inspirational books, religious texts, self-help, or business books. We are publicizing poetry collections by invitation only.

Learn more about Kima's work through Jack Jones by reading these features at the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Bitch MagazinePoets and Writers Magazine, Refinery 29NPR Code Switch, The RootNylon MagazineBisou Elle, Essence Magazine, LA Times, Girl Boss, Bitch Magazine and Hannah Magazine.

Current Campaigns

 
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Postcolonial Love Poem is an anthem of desire against erasure. Natalie Diaz’s brilliant second collection demands that every body carried in its pages—bodies of language, land, rivers, suffering brothers, enemies, and lovers—be touched and held as beloveds. Through these poems, the wounds inflicted by America onto an indigenous people are allowed to bloom pleasure and tenderness: “Let me call my anxiety, desire, then. / Let me call it, a garden.” In this new lyrical landscape, the bodies of indigenous, Latinx, black, and brown women are simultaneously the body politic and the body ecstatic. In claiming this autonomy of desire, language is pushed to its dark edges, the astonishing dunefields and forests where pleasure and love are both grief and joy, violence and sensuality.
 

Diaz defies the conditions from which she writes, a nation whose creation predicated the diminishment and ultimate erasure of bodies like hers and the people she loves: “I am doing my best to not become a museum / of myself. I am doing my best to breathe in and out. // I am begging: Let me be lonely but not invisible.” Postcolonial Love Poem unravels notions of American goodness and creates something more powerful than hope—a future is built, future being a matrix of the choices we make now, and in these poems, Diaz chooses love.  

 

In the last 18 months, many people have recognized the need to talk about race and found value in Oluo’s blend of personal anecdote, historical research and policy recommendation. So You Want to Talk about Race has been selected as a community read by dozens of municipalities and organizations across the country, and many universities as well. It has been embraced by the business community, suburban book clubs, and affinity groups for people of color. It was featured on more than a dozen “best of” lists and earned rave reviews from Library Journal to Vogue (please see below). Oluo has been approached time and again by people of color to thank her for putting words to their lived experience, and providing tools for those incredibly difficult conversations. White readers have thanked her for helping them on their own journeys to become more actively anti-racist.

Eighteen months later, the book is as urgent as ever. How do we talk about solutions for today’s problems without getting caught in the past? How do we address vast differences in racial perspective and experience? When we try to talk about race, these unanswered questions and hundreds like them make it likely that the discussion will end in hurt feelings, damaged relationships—maybe even violence. As a “writer, speaker, and internet yeller” on race and social justice issues, Ijeoma Oluo knows the pitfalls, and she’s seen the fallout when the conversations don’t go well. She’s also seen what’s possible when connections are made across the divide, and she’s urging us to keep trying.

Past Campaigns

Dolen Perkins-Valdez's Balm, strategic publicity in Los Angeles, 2015.

Kimbilio Fiction, strategic and cultural publicity and event planning in Minneapolis, Washington DC, Brooklyn, Dallas and Houston, 2015.

Naomi Jackson's The Star Side of Bird Hill, cultural publicity and tour planning in Washington DC, Los Angeles, Seattle, Oakland and Decatur, 2015.

Tananarive Due's Ghost Summer, launch party and strategic publicity in Los Angeles, 2015.

Nina Revoyr's Lost Canyon, strategic publicity in Los Angeles, 2015.

Tanwi Nandini Islam's Bright Lines, national strategic and cultural publicity, national tour planning 2015.

Elissa Blount Moorhead's P is for Pussy, strategic publicity and event planning in Baltimore, Brooklyn and Philadelphia, 2015-2016.

Desiree Cooper's Know the Mother, strategic and cultural publicity and national tour planning, 2016.

Strategic publicity and planning for Out of the Binder, Inc's LA conference, BinderCon, for women and gender-nonconforming writers, March 19-20, 2016.

Cole Lavalais's Summer of the Cicadas, strategic publicity and national tour planning, 2016.

Tyehimba Jess' Olio, strategic publicity and national and international event planning, 2015-2016.

Dr. Ashaki Jackson's Language Lesson, strategic publicity and launch planning, 2016.

Rion Amilcar Scott's Insurrections, national strategic and cultural publicity and launch planning, 2016.

Natalie Baszile's Queen Sugar, national cultural publicity, 2016. 

Strategic publicity and planning for Out of the Binder, Inc's NYC conference, BinderCon, for women and gender-nonconforming writers, October 29-30, 2016.

Kimbilio Fiction, strategic and cultural publicity and event planning in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Detroit, and Dallas, 2016.

Lilliam Rivera's The Education of Margot Sanchez, national strategic and cultural publicity and launch planning, 2017. 

Angie Thomas's The Hate U Give, supplemental strategic and cultural publicity and launch planning, 2017. 

Khadijah Queen's I'm So Fine: a list of famous men & what I had on, national strategic and cultural publicity and launch planning, 2017. 

Simone John's Testify, limited strategic publicity, 2017.

Dr. Natalie Graham's Begin with a Failed Body, limited strategic publicity and launch planning, 2017.

David Barclay Moore's The Stars Beneath Our Feet, supplemental strategic and cultural publicity and launch planning, 2017. 

Nic Stone's Dear Martin, supplemental strategic and cultural publicity, 2017. 

Aisha Sabatini Sloan's Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2017.

Leesa Cross-Smith's Whiskey and Ribbons, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Shauna Barbosa's Cape Verdean Blues, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Natalia Sylvester's Everyone Knows You Go Home, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Poetry Society of America's Four Quartets Prize, national publicity, 2018.

Renee Simms's Meet Behind Mars, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Bethany Morrow's MEM, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Angela Garbes's Like a Mother, west coast marketing, 2018.

Bernice McFadden’s Praise Song for the Butterflies, cultural publicity, 2018.

Janelle Milanes’s Analee, in Real Life, national strategic publicity, 2018.

Ashley Toliver’s Spectra, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018. 

Donald Quist’s For Other Ghosts, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

May-lee Chai’s Useful Phrases for Immigrants, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2018.

Grace Shuyli Liew’s Careen, national strategic publicity, 2019.

Lilliam Rivera’s Dealing in Dreams, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2019.

Keith Wilson’s Fieldnotes on Ordinary Love, national strategic publicity, 2019.

Jasmine Warga’s Other Words for Home, national strategic and cultural publicity, 2019.